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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 10 Oct 2020, 10:51
by JD
Advances in water desalination technology may greatly increase efficiency and lifespan of devices:
https://phys.org/news/2020-10-marangoni ... r-sea.html

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 15 Oct 2020, 15:32
by Hugh Akston
Researchers have found a room-temperature superconductor
Yet while researchers celebrate the achievement, they stress that the newfound compound — created by a team led by Ranga Dias of the University of Rochester — will never find its way into lossless power lines, frictionless high-speed trains, or any of the revolutionary technologies that could become ubiquitous if the fragile quantum effect underlying superconductivity could be maintained in truly ambient conditions. That’s because the substance superconducts at room temperature only while being crushed between a pair of diamonds to pressures roughly 75% as extreme as those found in the Earth’s core.

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 15 Oct 2020, 15:38
by Aresen
Hugh Akston wrote: 15 Oct 2020, 15:32 Researchers have found a room-temperature superconductor
Yet while researchers celebrate the achievement, they stress that the newfound compound — created by a team led by Ranga Dias of the University of Rochester — will never find its way into lossless power lines, frictionless high-speed trains, or any of the revolutionary technologies that could become ubiquitous if the fragile quantum effect underlying superconductivity could be maintained in truly ambient conditions. That’s because the substance superconducts at room temperature only while being crushed between a pair of diamonds to pressures roughly 75% as extreme as those found in the Earth’s core.
Ahem

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 15 Oct 2020, 15:40
by Hugh Akston
Aresen wrote: 15 Oct 2020, 15:38
Hugh Akston wrote: 15 Oct 2020, 15:32 Researchers have found a room-temperature superconductor
Yet while researchers celebrate the achievement, they stress that the newfound compound — created by a team led by Ranga Dias of the University of Rochester — will never find its way into lossless power lines, frictionless high-speed trains, or any of the revolutionary technologies that could become ubiquitous if the fragile quantum effect underlying superconductivity could be maintained in truly ambient conditions. That’s because the substance superconducts at room temperature only while being crushed between a pair of diamonds to pressures roughly 75% as extreme as those found in the Earth’s core.
Ahem
Sorry you posted that story in the wrong thread. Better luck next time.

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 23 Oct 2020, 11:40
by JD
The apparent discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus may have actually been an artifact of the data analysis, unfortunately:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... is-absent/

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 28 Oct 2020, 13:25
by JD
This is a bit short on details, but it is now being suggested that the popular "collapse" theory of Easter Island is not correct:
https://getpocket.com/explore/item/east ... t-be-wrong

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 28 Oct 2020, 13:44
by Hugh Akston
JD wrote: 28 Oct 2020, 13:25 This is a bit short on details, but it is now being suggested that the popular "collapse" theory of Easter Island is not correct:
https://getpocket.com/explore/item/east ... t-be-wrong
There's plenty of evidence of an environmental collapse driven by deforesation and the introduction of rats, but that may not have led to the tribal wars and cannibalism that Jared Diamond and Thor Heirdahl theorized.

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 19 Nov 2020, 18:46
by JD
This is not really "joys of life", but they're going to decommission the Arecibo radio telescope. :-( Apparently it just can't be fixed safely and cost-effectively. I know that it had a good run and everything comes to an end eventually, but it's been a part of science longer than I've been alive. When I was a kid, Arecibo was one of the coolest things ever.

https://www.theverge.com/2020/11/19/215 ... able-break

Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Posted: 19 Nov 2020, 18:58
by Aresen
JD wrote: 19 Nov 2020, 18:46 This is not really "joys of life", but they're going to decommission the Arecibo radio telescope. :-( Apparently it just can't be fixed safely and cost-effectively. I know that it had a good run and everything comes to an end eventually, but it's been a part of science longer than I've been alive. When I was a kid, Arecibo was one of the coolest things ever.

https://www.theverge.com/2020/11/19/215 ... able-break
Crap. Decommission an aircraft carrier instead and use a fraction of the money to refurbish Arecibo.