What are you drinking?

Music, books, movies, TV, games, hobbies, food, and potent potables. And forum games! Pour a drink, put on your smoking jacket, light a pipe (of whatever), and settle in.
User avatar
JD
Posts: 12324
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:26

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JD »

That's why I drink Old Crow. Old Crow is certainly better for the money than Jack Daniels, and I think it might be better in absolute terms, too.

All the talk about "old" drinks reminds of an idea I had the other night: a bar where you can only order things that would have been commonly available before 1965. I was a little surprised to realize I wasn't 100% sure what that would have been. Southern Comfort, certainly; Jack Daniels; Smirnoff; Beefeater Gin, Old Crow. A bunch of big mass-market American beers. Nothing in the way of microbrews, flavored vodkas, or exotic liquors, I suspect. Not sure how common things like tequila were.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
User avatar
D.A. Ridgely
Posts: 20609
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:09
Location: The Other Side

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Let's not forget Olde Frothingslosh Pale Stale Ale, either!

Image
User avatar
tr0g
Posts: 6785
Joined: 11 May 2011, 10:21
Location: At the shop

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by tr0g »

JD wrote:That's why I drink Old Crow. Old Crow is certainly better for the money than Jack Daniels, and I think it might be better in absolute terms, too.

All the talk about "old" drinks reminds of an idea I had the other night: a bar where you can only order things that would have been commonly available before 1965. I was a little surprised to realize I wasn't 100% sure what that would have been. Southern Comfort, certainly; Jack Daniels; Smirnoff; Beefeater Gin, Old Crow. A bunch of big mass-market American beers. Nothing in the way of microbrews, flavored vodkas, or exotic liquors, I suspect. Not sure how common things like tequila were.
Commonly available before 1965 is a killer. You have a lot of stuff that was difficult to come by or regional only in that time frame. The logistics explosion of the 80s made things much more widely available than they ever were before. A lot of your product would be the old Seagram's family of brands, since in that time frame, they ruled North America.

Available before 1965 is much easier, since most European stuff falls under that rule.

This reminds me of reading old cookbooks and realizing just how godawful the 50s and 60s were foodwise.
Yeah but how can you tell at a glance which junk a raccoon is packing? Also, gay raccoons? - Hugh Akston
Nothing you can say is as important as the existence of a functioning marketplace of ideas, go set yourself on fire. - JasonL
User avatar
JasonL
Posts: 25551
Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JasonL »

Yeah. Holy crap that was some horrible sad shit. Julia was a freaking revolutionary.
User avatar
tr0g
Posts: 6785
Joined: 11 May 2011, 10:21
Location: At the shop

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by tr0g »

JasonL wrote:Yeah. Holy crap that was some horrible sad shit. Julia was a freaking revolutionary.
I have a repro of the original Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook from '54. The dishes are amazing in their horrible blandness. They seriously advise you to fake a standing rib roast by cutting slits into a spam loaf, and glaze with ketchup. What's also amazing is the implicit and thoroughly casual sexism. If you are reading this cookbook, you are a housewife, period, full stop. There is no other possibility in the editors' minds.

I also have the original Gourmet cookbook, which is hilarious for a host of other reasons.
Yeah but how can you tell at a glance which junk a raccoon is packing? Also, gay raccoons? - Hugh Akston
Nothing you can say is as important as the existence of a functioning marketplace of ideas, go set yourself on fire. - JasonL
User avatar
JasonL
Posts: 25551
Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JasonL »

Seasoning, to include such exotics as black pepper, seems not to have existed before the late 60s.
User avatar
tr0g
Posts: 6785
Joined: 11 May 2011, 10:21
Location: At the shop

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by tr0g »

JasonL wrote:Seasoning, to include such exotics as black pepper, seems not to have existed before the late 60s.
The Gourmet is light years better than the BH&G in this respect, but I can't take a recipe that tells me 1/4 teaspoon of balck pepper is sufficient very seriously.
Yeah but how can you tell at a glance which junk a raccoon is packing? Also, gay raccoons? - Hugh Akston
Nothing you can say is as important as the existence of a functioning marketplace of ideas, go set yourself on fire. - JasonL
User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14713
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Kolohe »

tr0g wrote:
JasonL wrote:Seasoning, to include such exotics as black pepper, seems not to have existed before the late 60s.
The Gourmet is light years better than the BH&G in this respect, but I can't take a recipe that tells me 1/4 teaspoon of balck pepper is sufficient very seriously.
Though I've heard a theory that the quality of food being more localish and freshish (and pricier) was on average a bit better than today, so people didn't notice or mind as much. (though again, I think this is a bit too pat and take it with a huge grain of salt)
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex
User avatar
Highway
Posts: 13956
Joined: 12 May 2011, 00:22
Location: the Electric Ocean

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Highway »

Yeah, that's just nostalgic excuse making. No amount of locality and freshness makes up for no seasoning.

I don't know what opinion you guys have of James LIleks, but his Gallery of Regrettable Food really makes those old cookbooks hilarious.
"Sharks do not go around challenging people to games of chance like dojo breakers."
User avatar
pistoffnick
Posts: 2740
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 18:52
Location: Right behind you. Watching.

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by pistoffnick »

I used to enjoy reading him until the Iraq war came around. He's a rabid hawk for such a mild mannered newspaperman.
Always be suspicious of people who have, or crave, power. - Stanley Kubrick
"Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under." - H.L. Mencken
"The welfare of humanity is always the alibi of tyrants." - Albert Camus
User avatar
Highway
Posts: 13956
Joined: 12 May 2011, 00:22
Location: the Electric Ocean

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Highway »

I feel like he's backed off of that a bit, but yeah, his hawkishness is one of the things that I don't agree with anymore. But that's really not most of his writing, at least for me.
"Sharks do not go around challenging people to games of chance like dojo breakers."
User avatar
tr0g
Posts: 6785
Joined: 11 May 2011, 10:21
Location: At the shop

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by tr0g »

Highway wrote:Yeah, that's just nostalgic excuse making. No amount of locality and freshness makes up for no seasoning.

I don't know what opinion you guys have of James LIleks, but his Gallery of Regrettable Food really makes those old cookbooks hilarious.
Oh, yeah. The Gourmet has color photos of selected recipes and they are, in comparison with modern food photography, truly awful. It's a lot of brown lumps in congealed something.
Yeah but how can you tell at a glance which junk a raccoon is packing? Also, gay raccoons? - Hugh Akston
Nothing you can say is as important as the existence of a functioning marketplace of ideas, go set yourself on fire. - JasonL
User avatar
Fin Fang Foom
Posts: 9539
Joined: 05 May 2010, 22:39

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Fin Fang Foom »

I know it has to do with the era and photography technology, but the food pictures in the Gallery of Regrettable Food remind me of the "food" photography in Herschell Gordon Lewis's Blood Feast.
User avatar
Ayn_Randian
Posts: 10727
Joined: 08 May 2010, 14:58

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Ayn_Randian »

tr0g wrote:
Commonly available before 1965 is a killer. You have a lot of stuff that was difficult to come by or regional only in that time frame. The logistics explosion of the 80s made things much more widely available than they ever were before. A lot of your product would be the old Seagram's family of brands, since in that time frame, they ruled North America.
Speaking of, a very good friend found a bottle of Seagram's (a handle, actually) among his deceased grandmother's possessions that dates to 1966. how cool is that?
It has the effect of making me want desperately to do the opposite of what Green Day is suggesting I should want to do. Billy Joe Whassname may have created a generation of war mongers. - Jason L
User avatar
tr0g
Posts: 6785
Joined: 11 May 2011, 10:21
Location: At the shop

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by tr0g »

Ayn_Randian wrote:
tr0g wrote:
Commonly available before 1965 is a killer. You have a lot of stuff that was difficult to come by or regional only in that time frame. The logistics explosion of the 80s made things much more widely available than they ever were before. A lot of your product would be the old Seagram's family of brands, since in that time frame, they ruled North America.
Speaking of, a very good friend found a bottle of Seagram's (a handle, actually) among his deceased grandmother's possessions that dates to 1966. how cool is that?
My friend's parents used to have, as the centerpiece of their basement bar, a 5 gallon bottle of 7 Crown. It had a little plastic pump on top so you could get the booze out. They would occasionally go out and buy a handle or two to refill it.
Yeah but how can you tell at a glance which junk a raccoon is packing? Also, gay raccoons? - Hugh Akston
Nothing you can say is as important as the existence of a functioning marketplace of ideas, go set yourself on fire. - JasonL
User avatar
Stevo Darkly
Posts: 7242
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 19:13

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Stevo Darkly »

The Root of All Evil cocktail:

1 part St. George Ansinthe Verte brandy + 2 parts IBC Root Beer. On the rocks.
"I don't know if you can call it a stereotype when I was in a room full of people actually doing it." -- Keith S.
User avatar
Pham Nuwen
Posts: 8982
Joined: 27 Apr 2010, 02:17

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Pham Nuwen »

Petite syrah may be tough but its worth it.
Goddamn libertarian message board. Hugh Akston

leave me to my mescaline smoothie in peace, please. dhex
User avatar
JasonL
Posts: 25551
Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JasonL »

Pham Nuwen wrote:Petite syrah may be tough but its worth it.
Agree. I'd rather do petite than cab franc for a kind of similar experience. Even the concannon ones are not bad at low price points.
User avatar
Pham Nuwen
Posts: 8982
Joined: 27 Apr 2010, 02:17

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Pham Nuwen »

JasonL wrote:
Pham Nuwen wrote:Petite syrah may be tough but its worth it.
Agree. I'd rather do petite than cab franc for a kind of similar experience. Even the concannon ones are not bad at low price points.
I think we discussed this once. I don't know how people drink those Cab Francs. I've done it but you need some really flavor sharp food to go with it.
Goddamn libertarian message board. Hugh Akston

leave me to my mescaline smoothie in peace, please. dhex
User avatar
Ayn_Randian
Posts: 10727
Joined: 08 May 2010, 14:58

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Ayn_Randian »

I love Cab Franc!
It has the effect of making me want desperately to do the opposite of what Green Day is suggesting I should want to do. Billy Joe Whassname may have created a generation of war mongers. - Jason L
User avatar
JasonL
Posts: 25551
Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JasonL »

Ayn_Randian wrote:I love Cab Franc!
It kind of tastes like wet leaves.
User avatar
Warren
Posts: 30383
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Warren »

I had a Cab Franc once to die for. Velvet smooth, deep and rich notes of cherry, apricot, and hazelnut.
It was either the 2002 or 2003 Tabor Hill. I've never had a Cab Franc come anywhere near is since.
THIS SPACE FOR RENT
User avatar
JasonL
Posts: 25551
Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by JasonL »

Warren wrote:I had a Cab Franc once to die for. Velvet smooth, deep and rich notes of cherry, apricot, and hazelnut.
It was either the 2002 or 2003 Tabor Hill. I've never had a Cab Franc come anywhere near is since.
I've never had one of the North Coast (MI) bottles. It's a relatively recent thing. I'll try anything once so might give it a swirl.
User avatar
Warren
Posts: 30383
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Warren »

JasonL wrote:
Warren wrote:I had a Cab Franc once to die for. Velvet smooth, deep and rich notes of cherry, apricot, and hazelnut.
It was either the 2002 or 2003 Tabor Hill. I've never had a Cab Franc come anywhere near is since.
I've never had one of the North Coast (MI) bottles. It's a relatively recent thing. I'll try anything once so might give it a swirl.
Tabor hill has a fine dining restaurant at the vineyard. I had a glass with my meal that night, but did not buy a bottle because it was so expensive ($25!). By the time I was pining for it and ready to pony up, I went to one of their tasting rooms in town. They were out of that vintage, but I sampled the next year's. NOPE. And I've never found one like it again.

MI has a few good wineries. Tabor Hill is definitely the best of the Lake Michigan Shoreline Trail. I wouldn't know what's good now. I use to use their Basic Red and White for cooking. I had a bottle of their Cherry Wine I kept for several years, a most excellent desert wine.
THIS SPACE FOR RENT
User avatar
Ayn_Randian
Posts: 10727
Joined: 08 May 2010, 14:58

Re: What are you drinking?

Post by Ayn_Randian »

JasonL wrote:
Ayn_Randian wrote:I love Cab Franc!
It kind of tastes like wet leaves.
I love wet leaves!
It has the effect of making me want desperately to do the opposite of what Green Day is suggesting I should want to do. Billy Joe Whassname may have created a generation of war mongers. - Jason L
Post Reply